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NAMASTE - Anti-Racism Dialogues

Namaste is a formal greeting of respect offered by Hindus to one another. It has become popular in yoga culture, and a Christian parallel could be “the Christ in me affirms the Christ in you.” Former members of the Mission to Dismantle Racism, the Reparations Task Force and the Inclusion group of Diocesan Council chose this name in 2009 to underscore the spiritual aspect of the task of dismantling racism in our diocese and to embody our baptismal promise to respect the dignity of every human being.

Candidates standing for office at Diocesan Convention must complete anti-racism training:

No person shall be eligible for election to any office at Convention, nor shall any person elected by Districts, or appointed to serve on Diocesan Council or other Diocesan Standing Committees, Commissions or Boards accede to that office, unless that person shall have first completed or arranged for the completion of anti-racism training as approved by the Bishop after consultation with the Diocesan body responsible for overseeing anti-racism dialogues. – (Diocesan Canon 2.6)

Feedback on Anti-Racism Dialogues

 "The format of this program allows for thoughtful responses to a difficult topic.  Within each segment, I felt the need to examine my own understanding and position on how I define and react to racism.  The use of personal witness both by the presenters and members of the group made it all real and meaningful.  The result of this experience will be a more positive view of how I can make a difference in the lives of all those I shepherd."

"I left feeling enlightened, like a gift rather than guilty like a punishment.  Thank you for that."

"I was greatly impressed with the content, workshop approach, active participation, interest, deep dialogue and conversations.  The time spent was definitely worthwhile.  Areas that I would like to explore include historical and cultural traditions of the many varied races to better understand and work together to create greater harmony and peace.  There is a lot to be done..."